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PharmEd Flushing


       October 25, 2017 - Wednesday 
 
     Sheraton LaGuardia East
     135-20 39th Avenue
     Flushing, NY  11354
 
     
 
 
 
A one-day professional conference that offers pharmacists a source of CE credits, pharmacy product information, networking opportunities and gives pharmacists access to cutting edge information. Continental breakfast, lunch and afternoon refreshments will be served. 
 
Please note, handouts will not be available the day of the PharmEd/Clinical Update conferences.  You may download & print, or save a PDF of the handouts to your computer or other device. You must be registered for the conference to download the handouts directly from our website by logging in and clicking on the event. The handouts will become available 3 to 5 days before each conference.

Date: Oct 25, 2017 08:00 AM - 05:30 PM

Fee

$119.00

CE Hours

7.50

CE Units

0.750

Registration closes on Oct 24, 2017 11:00 PM

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
American Health Resources is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education

Requirements for CE Credit

  • Participant Requirement and Statement of Credit: To receive credit, participants must fully attend each session (no partial credit will be awarded), pass in a completed attendance verification form, and using the access code provided, complete the online evaluation for each session attended. Attendance will be verified. All participants will have the opportunity to evaluate the educational sessions and presenters as well as the ability to identify their future educational needs.                                                
  • Pharmacists: CE credit will be automatically uploaded to CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours where an official certificate of credit can be printed. Evaluations must be completed within 60 days of program date to receive credit.  
  • Statement of Disclosure: Disclosure will be made on the day of the program regarding any interest or affiliation a speaker may have with a supporting organization.
  • Refund Policy: A full refund will be provided only if a written request is received by American Health Resources, Inc. at least 48 hours prior to the program or if the program is cancelled. American Health Resources, Inc. reserves the right to change the presenters, topics or seminar schedules.
Only Certificates of Credit issued from CPE Monitor are valid in the US.  
CPE Monitor will not accept credits after 60 days from the session date.

Support/Credits

Supported by an independent Educational Grant from:
Boehringer-Ingleheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Lilly USA, LLC
 
Educational Supporter:
Clinical Education Initiative

 

 

 

   

Celiac disease is an important hereditary autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1 percent of the population of the United States. It is estimated that over 80% of patients with celiac disease remain undiagnosed leading experts to refer this disorder as a “hidden epidemic.” It has also been noted that a rapid increase in the global incidence of this condition is being observed. Although the majority of patients respond to a strict gluten-free diet, identifying patients with the disease, maintaining the required diet, and managing the symptoms and potential consequences of the disease in diagnosed and undiagnosed patients remains a challenge. Pharmacists may play an important role in identifying individuals suspected of having celiac disease and assisting diagnosed patients with the management of this common and yet often overlooked disease.
Knowledge Based

Objectives

  • Describe the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology and diagnostic work-up for patients with celiac disease and the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
  • Discuss the relationship between common misdiagnoses in patients with celiac disease, disorders “caused” by celiac disease and disorders “associated” with celiac disease.
  • Recognize how medications may be a “hidden” and potentially significant source of gluten and how to check for the gluten content of medications.
  • Explain why patients with celiac disease must maintain a strict life-long gluten-free diet/lifestyle.
  • Review acute and long-term health issues associated with celiac disease and how the pharmacist may assist patients in managing these concerns.
  • Discuss research being done on new therapeutic interventions for the management of celiac disease.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Robert Mangione picture

Robert Mangione, EdD, RPh
Dean, St. John's U. College of Pharmacy and Health Scien

Activity Number

0280-0000-17-083-L01-P
Date: 10/25/17
Time: 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

CE Hours

1.50
   

   

Inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents is still one of the major challenges facing the healthcare system. Therapeutic failures, increased frequency of adverse drug reactions and selection of antibiotic resistant pathogens all are linked to misuse of these agents which result in significant qualitative and quantitative costs. This presentation will discuss pharmacotherapeutic considerations to maximize efficacy, minimize toxicity and reduce antimicrobial associated costs. The role of antimicrobial stewardship programs will also be discussed.
Knowledge Based

Objectives

  • Describe the interaction between the patient, the organism and the antimicrobial agent as it applies to an appropriate outcome for the patient.
  • Identify significant patient factors as they pertain to this population.
  • List the common microbes associated with infections in humans.
  • Discuss the selection of an appropriate antibiotic regimen based on efficacy, toxicity and cost considerations.
  • Establish monitoring parameters for each patient.
  • Discuss the rationale and expectations of an antimicrobial stewardship program.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Joseph Brocavich picture

Joseph Brocavich, PharmD
Associate Dean, St. John's University College of Pharmacy

Activity Number

0280-0000-17-084-L01-P
Date: 10/25/17
Time: 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

CE Hours

1.50
   

   

This activity is designed to educate pharmacists to assist patients in managing their type 2 diabetes.  The activity will begin with an overview of the most recent guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE).  Goals and treatment algorithms for glycemic control will be compared.  Particular attention will be paid to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of basal insulins, SGLT2 inhibitors, DPP4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists.  Their role within the guidelines and especially combination therapy will be discussed.  An important component of the presentation will be case study review to illustrate drug selection and dosing for optimal glucose control and A1C reduction based on patient factors.  Studies have demonstrated the positive effects of pharmacist-directed medical management on glycemic control and treatment adherence.
Application Based

Objectives

  • Compare, contrast and apply newly released American Diabetes Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines for glycemic management in patients with type 2 diabetes.
  • Describe the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences of the SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1RAs, DPP4 inhibitors, and basal insulins, and their roles within the guidelines.
  • Evaluate current data of combination therapy, including fixed-ratio agents, based on efficacy, dosage form, and complementary actions.
  • Utilizing patient cases, formulate evidence-based treatment regimens that optimize both fasting and post-prandial glucose and A1C reduction.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Jennifer Goldman, PharmD, CDE, BC-ADM, FCCP picture

Jennifer Goldman, PharmD, CDE, BC-ADM, FCCP
MCPHS University


Brief Bio : Dr. Goldman has been a pharmacist for over 20 years and joined the faculty at MCPHS University in 1997. She is a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and coordinates and teaches in various therapeutics courses. She has maintained a practice in primary care and family medicine with a specialty in diabetes and cardiovascular disease since 1997 and currently takes students on rotation at Well Life Medical in Peabody, MA where she practices as a clinical pharmacist and certified diabetes educator (CDE). She is on state-wide and national organizational committees and boards including but not limited to The Massachusetts Adult Diabetes Guidelines Working Group for the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program at the Department of Public Health in Massachusetts. She has been the recipient of the Long Term Service, Trustees Award for Teaching Excellence, The Preceptor of the Year, and the Pharmacy Practice Teacher of the year at MCPHS University and has been recognized by the American Academy of Family Physicians for teaching in Family Medicine. Her primary research interests are in the areas of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and teaching.

Activity Number

0280-0000-17-086-L01-P
Date: 10/25/17
Time: 01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

2.00
   

   

Medical errors are believed to occur at an alarming rate and account for a significant proportion of the overall morbidly and mortality in the United States.  The presentation will review data regarding the incidence of such errors and their overall socioeconomic impact.  The difference between system errors and human errors will be reviewed and recommendations will be made on how to manage the various subclasses of human error including at-risk behavior and reckless behavior.   Often, human perception and confirmation bias contribute to errors in the healthcare system; examples of how such errors can manifest in everyday practice will be provided.   Finally, various direct causes of medical errors such as look-alike, sound-alike (LASA) medications, inappropriate product labeling, poor communication, and the inappropriate use of technology will reviewed with recommendations on how such errors can be minimized.
Knowledge Based

Objectives

  • Estimate the incidence of medical errors and their contribution to morbidity and mortality in the United States.
  • Differentiate between human error, at-risk behavior, and reckless behavior with regards to medical errors.
  • Explain how differences in human perception may result in medication errors.
  • Discuss means of avoiding errors due to look-alike, sound-alike medications.
  • Explain how the implementation of technology can introduce new errors into pharmacy practice.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Joseph Etzel  picture

Joseph Etzel , PharmD
Associate Professor, Associate Clinical Professor, St John's U. College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences


Brief Bio : Dr. Etzel is a double alumnus of St. John's University having earned his undergraduate degree in 1988 and Doctor of Pharmacy Degree in 1990. Following his graduate studies, he completed a residency focusing on infectious diseases and pharmacokinetics at Bassett Healthcare in Cooperstown, New York. He joined the faculty of the College of Pharmacy & Allied Health Professions in 1991 as a clinical faculty practitioner in the areas of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. In 2001, he joined the Office of the Dean as Assistant Dean for Pharmacy Student Affairs.

Activity Number

0280-0000-17-085-L05-P
Date: 10/25/17
Time: 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

Even though the overall incidence of HIV infection is slowly on the decline in the United States, populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) of color, transgender individuals, and women are still disproportionately affected. Prevention tools, including Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), needs to be effectively employed to help further reduce the incidence of HIV in the most affected populations. Pharmacists have a key role in prevention efforts such as PrEP, including identifying patients at risk for HIV infection, educating on the efficacy and use of PrEP, monitoring for adverse events and drug interactions, and providing the necessary resources.
Knowledge Based 

Objectives

  • Summarize the NYS and CDC Guidelines for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).
  • Discuss the efficacy of PrEP in different populations.
  • Identify challenges with PrEP.
  • Discuss important counseling points for patients receiving prescriptions for PrEP.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

John M. Conry, PharmD, AAHIVP, FNAP picture

John M. Conry, PharmD, AAHIVP, FNAP


Brief Bio : John M. Conry, PharmD, AAHIVP, FNAP; Clinical Professor and Chair, Department of Clinical Health Professions; Director,The Urban Institute, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, St. John’s University; Pharmacy Champion, NYSDOH AIDS Institute Clinical Education Initiative.

Activity Number

0280-9999-17-087-L02-P
Date: 10/25/17
Time: 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

CE Hours

1.50